Current Project: From Cohort to Badges

Facilitating an online cohort for approximately 5 weeks each semester used to be much simpler. However, with an increasing number of credentialed faculty members, getting enough participants to warrant a cohort experience is becoming a struggle. For some time now, I've really wanted to transition into a badging model. It's taken about a year to get there, but the project is finally underway!

So here's what our cohort used to look like:

This is the course banner and description, giving participants a way to immediately differentiate this course shell amongst all of the shells they have access to.

This is the course banner and description, giving participants a way to immediately differentiate this course shell amongst all of the shells they have access to.

Here's a gallery of screenshots taken from Units 1-5:

So what does the experience look like now? Well, it's in its development at the moment, but our plan is to have participants be able to complete the separate modules in their own time frame. There are still learning outcomes or targets with specific assessment pieces (that still give participants the ability to walk away with created content they can immediate utilize), but the various sections of the original experience are now independent. 

Learners have the option to earn a badge for each module they complete. Here's what our first module currently looks like. (Bear with me because it's definitely still in creation!)

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There are several sections below what you can see here which will cover best practices and some of the research that's been done involving learning outcomes. We want to make sure badge-earners are getting an experience rooted in the academic work that's been done. 

Here's one of the resources:

This resources covers a little more than a handful of methodologies or approaches to creating learning outcomes. The first one I've been working on is what you see here, which is backward design (or UbD as Wiggins and McTighe reference it). 

This resources covers a little more than a handful of methodologies or approaches to creating learning outcomes. The first one I've been working on is what you see here, which is backward design (or UbD as Wiggins and McTighe reference it). 

 

I'm having a really hard time stepping out of work mode these days. I'm constantly thinking about different and new ways to approach these topics, and I'm so excited to be able to share a gamified experience appropriate for adult learners, in the hopes that they, too, will want to try something like this!